Intermediate Arabic Bridge


The New School

Arabic on the Go: Level 2

Before traveling to the Middle East, stop at The New School for a weekend immersion in Levantine Arabic. Master common situations such as asking for directions, handling currency, ordering in restaurants, and shopping. Make rapid progress learning to converse in Levantine Arabic. Level 1 is for complete beginners. No prior knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic is required. Since the focus of this course is conversation, phonetic transliterations are used. The workshop meets consecutive Saturdays...
The New School

Arabic on the Go: Level 1

Before traveling to the Middle East, stop at The New School for a weekend immersion in Levantine Arabic. Master common situations such as asking for directions, handling currency, ordering in restaurants, and shopping. Make rapid progress learning to converse in Levantine Arabic. Level 1 is for complete beginners. No prior knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic is required. Since the focus of this course is conversation, phonetic transliterations are used. The workshop meets consecutive Saturdays...
The New School

Arabic Intro Intensive

This accelerated first course integrates Modern Standard Arabic (Fus-ha) and Levantine Arabic, introducing the Arabic alphabet and sound system along with basic conversational skills in Levantine. Students learn to engage in simple conversations and write short compositions about themselves, their families, and other familiar topics. This course is for beginners who would like to progress rapidly.
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Arabic Level 2

Students who have completed Level 1 expand their vocabulary and improve their grammar skills. More complex topics of conversation are introduced. Arabic is the main medium of instruction. Prerequisite: Arabic Level 1, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
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Summer Writers Colony:Fiction

Workshop classes are limited to 12 students. The writing workshop is the core of this intensive curriculum. An experienced writer-teacher focuses on students' manuscripts, guiding students in the creative acts of revision and self-editing through class exercises and private conferences. To register for the Summer Writers Colony, select the workshop you would like to attend. Note: After you have registered, choose one literary salon per week and email your list to summerwriters@newschool.edu.
The New School

Summer Writers Colony:Nonfict

Workshop classes are limited to 12 students. The writing workshop is the core of this intensive curriculum. An experienced writer-teacher focuses on students' manuscripts, guiding students in the creative acts of revision and self-editing through class exercises and private conferences. To register for the Summer Writers Colony, select the workshop you would like to attend. Note: After you have registered, choose one literary salon per week and email your list to summerwriters@newschool.edu.
The New School

Summer Writers Colony:Poetry

Workshop classes are limited to 12 students. The writing workshop is the core of this intensive curriculum. An experienced writer-teacher focuses on students' manuscripts, guiding students in the creative acts of revision and self-editing through class exercises and private conferences. To register for the Summer Writers Colony, select the workshop you would like to attend. Note: After you have registered, choose one literary salon per week and email your list to summerwriters@newschool.edu.
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Advanced Fiction Writing: Revise and Polish

The workshop is an opportunity for writers to speed their creative and technical maturation. This course is for students who are beyond introductory courses and are ready to take their writing to a higher level. Workshop time is dedicated primarily to student work; assignments look toward and initiate tasks commonly encountered by aspiring writers. The intention of the course is to help individuals prepare themselves and their work for the next phase of their vocation, be it approaching editor...
The New School

Making Poems: An Advanced Workshop

Permission required. “Good poets borrow; great poets steal.” Poetry in English is a storehouse we can raid at will. The focus in this workshop for experienced writers is discussion of student poems, but we also explore ways to make creative use of other poems, from the most recent innovations to the poetry of the Middle Ages. Each week, suggested assignments, illustrated by a wide range of models, serve as jumping-off points from which to explore. Every strong poem is experimental. Student...
The New School

Streetwise: Writing from NYC Street Art

Street Art and Hip-Hop originated in The Bronx and became a global influence, even playing an essential role in the fall of the Berlin Wall. It continues to mirror the population's direct needs and opinions and in New York City there are as many opinions as there are New Yorkers. This course sets out to visit Street Art's visual neighborhoods: East Village's ABC City, Chelsea and the High Line, the Bowery Wall and the Lower East Side, and Williamsburg. We carry cellphone cameras and document ...
The New School

Meditation and Writing

This five-week course offers a haven for creative people in the midst of our noisy, screen-filled city. In the quiet of the Rubin Museum, we meditate and develop our ability to notice more and to stay open to all that arises. We bring attention to our breath, to the Himalayan art, to texts, and to our own words. As we practice not judging, we make room for our writing to surprise us. As poet Denise Levertov says in “Making Peace”: “peace…can’t be imagined before it is made/can’t be...
The New School

The New School: The Soap Opera

In this one-of-a-kind cooperative effort with media studies, writers fashion and manufacture a multi-media, multi-cultural, multi-indy soap operatic event. We create a fictive world, write scripts, and launch a website with text artifacts and other extras from our "show." Readings explore the political structures of the soap opera, from the epic forms of myth and religion to the bougie forms of the novel and event television. Meanwhile, our fellows in the media department, in a class of the...
The New School

Children's Book Illustration and Writing

In this course, each student develops a children's book from an initial concept to a "dummy" ready for submission to a publisher. The class explores the entire production process, including searching for ideas, writing a first draft, making sketches and character studies, editing, creating finished artwork and dummies, and writing cover letters and submitting a finished work to publishers. Writing assignments help students focus their ideas and build their stories. Illustration assignments lea...
The New School

Playwriting from Personal Experience

How do you start writing a play? In this workshop, students use personal experience as a springboard for generating original characters, stories, and imagery for the stage. Basic elements of playwriting are explored through in-class writing exercises and weekly writing assignments. We experiment with the possibilities of dramatic storytelling, with an emphasis on fictionalizing and transforming personal experiences and memories. Students read their own work aloud and discuss it in class and al...
The New School

Playwriting

An introduction to the basics of drama, including story, character, conflict, scene construction, and overall plotting. Students also consider issues such as drama as metaphor, realities of staging, and production problems. The course is geared to the theatrical experience of each student, with readings and writing exercises suggested when appropriate. Feedback from classmates approximates an audience experience, and the instructor provides detailed responses to all work submitted. Students sh...
The New School

Print media is on the decline and may well be on the way out, but readers continue to flock to the Internet to get their fill of media. What does this mean for aspiring journalists and authors? How ca

Print media is on the decline and may well be on the way out, but readers continue to flock to the Internet to get their fill of media. What does this mean for aspiring journalists and authors? How can they prepare for the brave new world of Web reporting, blogging, and multimedia journalism and still be true to their dreams of creating great nonfiction writing? The simple truths of communicating are the same in any medium. Students practice narrative style, interviewing techniques, and anecdo...
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New Media Journalism

No longer limited to once-a-day deadlines and publications, journalists are now required to know how to deliver accurate news reports using a variety of media formats. Students learn to use Facebook, Twitter, and other social media to crowd source ideas, connect with interview subjects, and break stories in real time. Emphasis is on writing well-crafted stories. Projects include live reporting an event on Twitter, creating and analyzing videos, and packaging news reports.
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Writing for New York City Newspapers and Magazines

The New York Times, Daily News, Newsday, New York Post, and Wall Street Journal all use freelance writers for profiles, features, reviews, news stories, humor, and editorials. So do New York Magazine, the Village Voice, Time Out New York, and the New Yorker. Taught by a writer whose work has appeared in more than 100 publications, this course reveals the secrets of breaking in. Topics include tailoring pieces to specific columns, writing a perfect cover and pitch letter, contacting the right e...
The New School

The Experimental Essay

The experimental essay trespasses on poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. It evolves from trials, impulses, longings, and risks—often culminating in a form that is both surprising and inventive. It is a genre in which, as Emerson says, "everything is admissible, philosophy, ethics, divinity, criticism, poetry, humor, fun, mimicry, anecdotes, jokes, ventriloquism." We read a variety of experimental essays, spanning different time periods and cultures. Paying close attention to form as well as...
The New School

Self and Craft Creative Writing

This exploration of the craft of fiction and of expressive, personal nonfiction (essays, memoirs, reminiscences, humor, travel sketches) balances technical concerns with awareness of how the writing process engages and transforms the writer's self. The "process" approach to writing, which recognizes that imaginative work often discovers its true subject, style, and form in the course of several revisions, is stressed, as is a professional approach to regularly putting words on paper. Class ses...
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Radical Generation

Using experiments, tricks, prompts, and forms from masters of radical generation, we flip the usual model of the workshop to produce, in class, the maximum amount of writing possible in ten weeks. Unlike in traditional workshop settings, editing happens outside of class. Across genres we study the methods of both radically prolific writers as well as writers whose content was radical in the context of their own generations. We work to transform our writing lives from miserly and stuck to abund...
The New School

Writing Your Personal Story

This workshop teaches students methods of capturing their own memories, dreams, childhood experiences, and personal truths in a unique voice. They learn how to write with precision of thought and language, unimpeded by the inner critic. Exercises in class and weekly writing assignments help students establish disciplined work habits. The instructor critiques all student work, suggesting revisions and guiding serious writers toward publication. Assigned readings provide models of subject matter...
The New School

Memoir Writing

“The memoir is the novel of the 21st century,” writes Susan Cheever. This contemporary art form holds a prominent place in today’s literary world. Editors respond to voice and tone, where writers capture the story, transport readers to another place, and convey honest feelings. Memoirs range from the humorous style of David Sedaris, to the stark minimalism of Joan Didion and Nick Flynn, who push new boundaries. This workshop is designed for writers who have started a memoir as well as...
The New School

Food Narratives

Food, glorious food! Is food a source of pleasure or anxiety? What did you have for dinner last night or for breakfast this morning? How did you decide what to eat and how to prepare it? Do you long for the food of your childhood? Does your religion and spiritual life guide your food choices? How would you describe the flavors of last night's meal to your best friend? These are the sorts of questions that trigger the most memorable writing on the subject of cuisine and gastronomy. In this cou...
The New School

Essay Writing in a Changing World

The world of writing and reading is changing rapidly, in large part because of changing technology. This writing course is designed for students eager to use new technologies to write and publish personal essays, including autobiographical essays, arts and cultural criticism, and pieces about race and ethnicity and social and political change. Assignments draw attention to the connections and tensions between individual experience and social context. Students write five short pieces and two lo...
The New School

Intermediate Fiction Workshop

This workshop is designed for students who have writing experience or life experience that puts them beyond the beginner level. Class exercises develop writing skills and broaden students' awareness of creative possibilities. Readings on structure and technique by Madison Smartt Bell and Joyce Carol Oates guide the class's thinking and discussions. Selected works by contemporary authors, coupled with interviews from the Paris Review, encourage students to explore influences and techniques. Stu...
The New School

Fiction Writing: Memory, Imagination, Desire

Fiction, though we write it to share with the world, comes from a place within us that is a private, interior alembic in which memory and imagination, heated by desire, mix. This course helps students discover this special place and the voices that arise from it and learn how to draw these voices into a well-written story. We ponder the essential mystery of putting words on paper--how to discover material, conquer initial confusion or lack of confidence, and proceed with discipline. Basics are...
The New School

Fiction Writing

This course acquaints students with aspects of fiction-writing technique. It is designed for students trying to develop a project or find the approach with which they can best express themselves. The instructor discusses viewpoint, mood, characterization, dialogue, plot, and story. Readings from the works of Joyce, Hemingway, Sterne, and D. H. Lawrence demonstrate these elements. During the early weeks, the instructor may give assignments to help students explore their own experiences for real...
The New School

The Novel Workshop

This workshop is for students who want to develop the discipline and skills needed to write a novel. Exercises keep the class writing at a fast clip and are aimed at developing facility with elements of the novel, such as character, story, plot, dialogue, and meaning. Students encounter different possibilities of form, style, and subject matter through close readings of historical and contemporary novelists including Charles Dickens, Jane Austen, Jean Rhys, James Baldwin, Joan Didion, and Lynn...
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Poetry: The Language of Music

This study of musical poetics focuses on the buried linguistic and musical structures of poetry and on the way these structures create voice and meaning in a poem. We discuss the way music serves as a muse for the poet and creates a relationship between form and content. Some class time is devoted to close reading of established and younger poets representing different poetic styles, and to close listening to the voices of poets reading from their own work. Most class time, however, is devoted...
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From Silence to Poem

Beginning and advanced writers work on dismantling silences in their lives and generating poems from personal experience. We work in a safe, functional community to open hidden places within ourselves. The heretical Gospel According to Thomas says, "If you do not bring forth that which is within you, that which is within you will destroy you. If you bring forth that which is within you, that which is within you will save you." This notion informs our work together, enabling the writer to follo...
The New School

Journalism Basics

Writing a well-structured, high-quality newspaper or magazine story is not easy. Students interested in journalism are challenged to write clear, evocative, and compelling prose with exercises, assignments and deadlines, specific tips, and plenty of encouragement. Students examine contemporary newspaper and magazine writing, including current stories in the New York Times, Newsday, and the Washington Post, as well as a variety of Pulitzer Prize–winning pieces. Magazines and newspapers th...
The New School

Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

This workshop is for serious beginners as well as more experienced writers who want to delve into the still-evolving genre of creative nonfiction, which includes personal essay, memoir, documentary, and literary journalism. Through in-class writing and weekly assignments, students develop the skills to build a narrative frame around real-life events and situations. Student work is read and discussed in class. Readings from both The Art of the Personal Essay: An Anthology from the Classical Era...
The New School

Beginning the Novel

In a relaxed and supportive but intellectually rigorous atmosphere, this beginner's course explores the delicate alchemy that produces excellent fiction. In our attempt to pinpoint exactly why we feel certain works are successful, we scrutinize character, tone, point of view, setting, plot, and dialogue, with a focus on the metaphor as a resonant thematic pattern. Close attention is paid to craft, to the necessary artifice behind the art of fiction. The course is taught as an interactive works...
The New School

Introduction to Fiction

This course is intended to encourage and guide students who are starting to explore the many creative possibilities fiction affords. Through reading assignments, writing exercises, and discussions, we consider character development, dialogue, point of view, and significant detail. Attention is also paid to recognizing good ideas, developing stories, finding the best structure, and honing one's own unique voice. The majority of class time is spent reviewing projects by students, which are works...
The New School

Beginning Poetry Workshop

"A poem," said William Carlos Williams, "is a small (or large) machine made of words--efficient, with no unnecessary parts, doing important work." In this workshop, students learn how to build verse, from the individual word through lines and stanzas to the finished, polished poem. Poetic inspiration is explored: what activities can summon it and how to use it when it happens. Writing exercises help students practice basic elements of the craft, such as line breaks, voice, and openings and clo...
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Academic Writing

Writing well is the key to success in college. This course teaches students the foundations of academic writing: the nature of research; the skills of criticism, analysis, and argumentation; the process of revision; and the basics of correct grammar and American English usage. Note: Students for whom English is a foreign language should take ESL Academic Writing instead of this course.
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Writing for Artists

Writing is performance. Visual artists, designers, musicians, writers, dancers, filmmakers, actors, artists of every kind come together in a supportive workshop environment to develop their writing skills. Students practice the skills of argumentation, research, and clarity of expression that benefit critical pieces as well as the kinds of writing they are likely to have to produce as professional artists or critics in the field. In the first half of the class, students learn the craft of cr...
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Style and Effectiveness

It's how you say it. In this short course, students consider the elements that work together to create stylish and effective prose, by dissecting the choices every writer makes that add up to style. The class reads examples of effective prose by best-selling authors, including Toni Cade Bambara, Garrett Hongo, and Amy Tan, and students write short pieces inspired by the readings and workshop them in class. This course offers a supportive environment in which to think critically about and stren...
The New School

Building the Sentence

Good writing is the sum of its verbs, and every writer who wants his or her words on the page to be taken seriously must master certain skills. In this short course, students focus on two essential components of composition that trip up even seasoned writers: verb use and syntax. Exercises illustrate the correct use of the past and future tenses and the conditional as well as common mistakes in subject-verb agreement. The class then addresses the rules of English syntax, or word order. Student...
The New School

Punctuation

Second-guess yourself no more. This course provides a supportive structure for mastering proper punctuation. No punctuation mark is left unturned as students learn the use of the comma, the semicolon, apostrophes, quotation marks, em and en dashes, the colon, parentheses, ellipses, question marks and, happily, exclamation points. Each week, students write short essays in which they practice punctuation. Everyone gives and receives feedback as part of the ongoing discussion.
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The Mechanics of Writing

The study of effective English prose makes the sentence its principal focus. In this course, designed to meet the needs of beginning writers, we examine the sentence, looking at syntax, the parts of speech, and other aspects of grammar. Later we look ahead to considerations of effectiveness and style. Chapters from a grammar and style textbook are assigned. Students workshop short writing assignments weekly. They look at what is correct versus what is incorrect and when rules should be broken,...
The New School

Isaac Babel: A "Soviet Tolstoy"

“Isaac Babel writes in the same tone about the stars and gonorrhea,” Viktor Shklovsky once observed. This seminar explores the work of Odessan author Isaac Babel (1894-1940), the Jewish Russian master of the short story. The course will include close readings of his texts, with attention to his contexts and legacy beyond Russian letters. Students will also engage with an exhibit on Babel and the Odessa painter Yefim Ladyzhensky at the Center for Jewish History. Prerequisite: prior coursewo...
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Literary Laurels

This course features recent recipients of prestigious national and global literary awards, including the Nobel Prize, Impac Award, Pulitzer Price, Prix Goncourt, Booker Prize, Pen-Hemingway Award, National Book Critics Circle Award, MacArthur Award. This is an opportunity to explore the best in postmodern literature in a global context, including major authors from the United States, Canada, Nigeria, Ireland, Senegal, France, Spain, England, Holland. Settings range from the court of Henry VII...
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Other Worlds: Exploring the Critical Realms of Science Fiction

The development of science fiction as a literary genre is closely connected to the history of colonialism and anthropological projects documenting contact with so-called primitive cultures. We examine literary and filmic narratives involving other worlds, bodies, and technologies within this historical legacy. In particular, we discuss how science fiction writers explore systems of oppression while imagining new possibilities for political transformation.
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Chekhov and the Birth of the Modern Theater

In addition to Chekhov’s four full-length plays, we will read closely, discuss and analyze representative works by the major European creators of the Modern Theater - Ibsen, Strindberg, Brecht, Pirandello, Beckett, Stoppard and others. Our discussions will be informed by secondary readings in the history of the theater from Realism and Naturalism to Symbolism, Agit-theater and the Theater of the Absurd. Over the course of the semester, we will observe the creation and development of recogni...
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Nabokov's Lolita

This mini-course is devoted to one of the most famous, influential, and controversial American novels of the twentieth century, Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita. In addition to a close reading of the novel, we will also read about and discuss the following issues: the novel's place in Nabokov's oeuvre as well as in contemporary American literature; literary censorship and the notion of the obscene in literature; the rise of post-modern fiction. Finally, we will screen and discuss adaptations of th...
The New School

Dangerous Liaisons: Love in French Literature

The greatness of French classical literature lies in its treatment of human passions, as Albert Camus proclaimed. In this course, we study masterpieces illustrating various aspects of love and literary expression through the centuries. Passionate love, whether platonic or overtly sexual, is an enduring theme in French literature, from the 17th-century novel The Princess of Clèves to Duras' The Lover and Ernaux's Simple Passion. We begin with classic works by the 17th-century tragedians ...
The New School

Why DI?: An Introduction to Differentiated Instruction

This course is an interactive computer-based instruction course, designed to give you an understanding of the framework of and need for creating supportive learning environments for diverse learning populations. In this course you will learn what is meant by Differentiated Instruction (DI) and the common myths associated with creating the differentiated classroom. We will discuss the legal, theoretical, and pedagogical foundations in the field of education that support the utilization of diffe...
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